Softwood

Eastern White Pine

The Eastern white pine, a species native to Eastern Canada, is the tallest conifer in eastern Canada. Its wood is the least resinous of all pines. It is a fast-growing tree, sometimes reaching heights of 90 metres and diameters of 250 centimetres. With its uniform texture, Eastern white pine is used for mouldings, cabinetwork, doors, windows, siding, panelling and do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Its wood is tender and ranges from creamy white to yellow. It is valued for its fine grain and workability.

Spruce Pine Fir(SPF)

The Eastern white pine, a species native to Eastern Canada, is the tallest conifer in eastern Canada. Its wood is the least resinous of all pines. It is a fast-growing tree, sometimes reaching heights of 90 metres and diameters of 250 centimetres. With its uniform texture, Eastern white pine is used for mouldings, cabinetwork, doors, windows, siding, panelling and do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Its wood is tender and ranges from creamy white to yellow. It is valued for its fine grain and workability.

Red Pine or Norway Pine

Red Pine resembles Eastern White Pine in their overall form. Red Pine is a slow-growing native tree found mainly in Eastern Canada. In homogeneous stands, often in plantations, or in mixed natural stands in association with White Pine or Jack Pine, it can reach diameters up to 60 cm and heights of 25 m. Since the wood grain is straight and readily treated with preservatives, Red Pine can therefore be used outdoors and in contact with soil, and is suitable for poles, piling, railway ties and balconies.

Eastern White Cedar

Eastern white cedar is a slow-growing conifer, native to north-eastern North America. Averaging a height of 15 to 20 metres and a diameter ranging from 40 to 90 centimetres, it can reach over 20 metres at maturity with a diameter of 120 to 150 centimetres. It has remarkable longevity and some specimens live to be 800 years old. Its wood is stable, finely textured and extremely long lasting. It offers exceptional natural resistance to insects and decay, resulting in excellent durability. Its structure makes it a very good insulating material when it comes to sound and heat. Cedar does not require any preservatives or special maintenance. It is a natural alternative to treated wood.

Jack Pine

Jack pine is produced predominantly as SPF* lumber in structural grades according to National Lumber Grades Authority (NLGA) rules for dimension lumber. In this form, Jack Pine should be widely available as construction lumber for a modest price. It is used in building construction as framing, sheathing, scaffolding and interior woodwork. Jack pine is also used for boxes and crates. Other uses of jack pine include power poles, railroad ties and treated posts.

Hardwood

White AshWood

White ash is a valued hardwood. Its admirable strength, hardness, and elasticity make it ideal for such products as baseball bats, billiard cues, hockey sticks tool handles, utility furniture, and vehicle and boat parts. This versatile wood is also widely used for fine flooring, cabinetry and furniture. If you are looking for a wood that combines strength and lightness, white ash might just be the best choice for your next project.

Sugar Maple

Sugar Maple is also commonly known as Hard Maple, Rock Maple, Black Maple, or Curly Maple. The wood is one of the most valuable hardwoods in Canada. Sugar maple is also highly valued for its hard, fine-grained wood, which is used for making furniture, musical instruments, veneer, cutting blocks, flooring, rolling pins and more. The wood also shows up as cabinets, countertops, cutting boards, and butcher block.

Red Oak

The Red Oak is one of the most important oaks for timber production in North America. Quality red oak is of high value as lumber and veneer, while defective logs are used as firewood. Being the most commonly used hardwood in North America, red oak's uses are extensive, including mine timbers, railroad ties, architectural interiors, flooring, millwork, cabinetry, plywood, coffins, pallets and more. The bark in red oak is rich in tannin, used in tanning leather.

Walnut

Walnut is a hard, tough wood prized as a cabinet making wood. It is also popular in the United States for gunstocks and rifle butts. Extensively used in high-quality furniture, cabinetmaking, boatbuilding, musical instruments, clock cases, turning and carving. Sliced or cut for paneling, veneers.

White Oak

The most common White Oak, Quercus Alba, grows throughout eastern North America from Florida northward to southern Quebec. It is a long-lived species typically living well past 200 years. It generally achieves heights of 65' to 85' with diameters of 3' to4'. The wood is hard, tough and durable, prized in boat and shipbuilding because it steam bends well. White Oak is also used in fine furniture, flooring, cabinetry, interior trim, and decorative veneer.